Saturday, 23 August 2014

'Dr Howl' Materialises on Amazon Kindle

Fenriswulf Books are pleased to announce the latest addition to their eBook graphic novel catalogue: Dr Howl!


Puns and mirth abound in this loving tribute to classic sci-fi television, starring  lowbrow underground comic stars Arf & Mo as a myriad of intergalactic Time Lords, their companions and enemies, all courtesy of Mr Frank Bland.

US readers can download theirs here.

UK readers can reverse the polarity of their eBook readers here.


Recommended for mature sci-fi fans. Images (c) Frank Bland and Fenriswulf Books, 2014.

Wednesday, 13 August 2014

Authors Get Upset at Amazon

We didn't think this one would stay quiet...

Following Amazon's open letter to KDP authors which we posted about recently, the BBC reported this by Monday afternoon.

Whose side are you on?

Saturday, 9 August 2014

The Amazon vs Hachette Battle Just Got Personal

I checked my email this afternoon to find the following missive, sent from an Amazon KDP support address. I reproduce it here in its entirety. I expect all other writers who have ever supported the Amazon KDP platform will also have received it, but if you haven't it makes interesting reading - especially if you've been following the Amazon v Hachette row in the media in recent months:

"Dear KDP Author,

Just ahead of World War II, there was a radical invention that shook the foundations of book publishing. It was the paperback book. This was a time when movie tickets cost 10 or 20 cents, and books cost $2.50. The new paperback cost 25 cents – it was ten times cheaper. Readers loved the paperback and millions of copies were sold in just the first year.

With it being so inexpensive and with so many more people able to afford to buy and read books, you would think the literary establishment of the day would have celebrated the invention of the paperback, yes? Nope. Instead, they dug in and circled the wagons. They believed low cost paperbacks would destroy literary culture and harm the industry (not to mention their own bank accounts). Many bookstores refused to stock them, and the early paperback publishers had to use unconventional methods of distribution – places like newsstands and drugstores. The famous author George Orwell came out publicly and said about the new paperback format, if “publishers had any sense, they would combine against them and suppress them.” Yes, George Orwell was suggesting collusion.

Well… history doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.

Fast forward to today, and it’s the e-book’s turn to be opposed by the literary establishment. Amazon and Hachette – a big US publisher and part of a $10 billion media conglomerate – are in the middle of a business dispute about e-books. We want lower e-book prices. Hachette does not. Many e-books are being released at $14.99 and even $19.99. That is unjustifiably high for an e-book. With an e-book, there’s no printing, no over-printing, no need to forecast, no returns, no lost sales due to out of stock, no warehousing costs, no transportation costs, and there is no secondary market – e-books cannot be resold as used books. E-books can and should be less expensive.

Perhaps channeling Orwell’s decades old suggestion, Hachette has already been caught illegally colluding with its competitors to raise e-book prices. So far those parties have paid $166 million in penalties and restitution. Colluding with its competitors to raise prices wasn’t only illegal, it was also highly disrespectful to Hachette’s readers.

The fact is many established incumbents in the industry have taken the position that lower e-book prices will “devalue books” and hurt “Arts and Letters.” They’re wrong. Just as paperbacks did not destroy book culture despite being ten times cheaper, neither will e-books. On the contrary, paperbacks ended up rejuvenating the book industry and making it stronger. The same will happen with e-books.

Many inside the echo-chamber of the industry often draw the box too small. They think books only compete against books. But in reality, books compete against mobile games, television, movies, Facebook, blogs, free news sites and more. If we want a healthy reading culture, we have to work hard to be sure books actually are competitive against these other media types, and a big part of that is working hard to make books less expensive.

Moreover, e-books are highly price elastic. This means that when the price goes down, customers buy much more. We've quantified the price elasticity of e-books from repeated measurements across many titles. For every copy an e-book would sell at $14.99, it would sell 1.74 copies if priced at $9.99. So, for example, if customers would buy 100,000 copies of a particular e-book at $14.99, then customers would buy 174,000 copies of that same e-book at $9.99. Total revenue at $14.99 would be $1,499,000. Total revenue at $9.99 is $1,738,000. The important thing to note here is that the lower price is good for all parties involved: the customer is paying 33% less and the author is getting a royalty check 16% larger and being read by an audience that’s 74% larger. The pie is simply bigger.

But when a thing has been done a certain way for a long time, resisting change can be a reflexive instinct, and the powerful interests of the status quo are hard to move. It was never in George Orwell’s interest to suppress paperback books – he was wrong about that.

And despite what some would have you believe, authors are not united on this issue. When the Authors Guild recently wrote on this, they titled their post: “Amazon-Hachette Debate Yields Diverse Opinions Among Authors” (the comments to this post are worth a read).  A petition started by another group of authors and aimed at Hachette, titled “Stop Fighting Low Prices and Fair Wages,” garnered over 7,600 signatures.  And there are myriad articles and posts, by authors and readers alike, supporting us in our effort to keep prices low and build a healthy reading culture. Author David Gaughran’s recent interview is another piece worth reading.

We recognize that writers reasonably want to be left out of a dispute between large companies. Some have suggested that we “just talk.” We tried that. Hachette spent three months stonewalling and only grudgingly began to even acknowledge our concerns when we took action to reduce sales of their titles in our store. Since then Amazon has made three separate offers to Hachette to take authors out of the middle. We first suggested that we (Amazon and Hachette) jointly make author royalties whole during the term of the dispute. Then we suggested that authors receive 100% of all sales of their titles until this dispute is resolved. Then we suggested that we would return to normal business operations if Amazon and Hachette’s normal share of revenue went to a literacy charity. But Hachette, and their parent company Lagardere, have quickly and repeatedly dismissed these offers even though e-books represent 1% of their revenues and they could easily agree to do so. They believe they get leverage from keeping their authors in the middle.

We will never give up our fight for reasonable e-book prices. We know making books more affordable is good for book culture. We’d like your help. Please email Hachette and copy us.

Hachette CEO, Michael Pietsch: Michael.Pietsch@hbgusa.com

Copy us at: readers-united@amazon.com

Please consider including these points:

- We have noted your illegal collusion. Please stop working so hard to overcharge for ebooks. They can and should be less expensive.
- Lowering e-book prices will help – not hurt – the reading culture, just like paperbacks did.
- Stop using your authors as leverage and accept one of Amazon’s offers to take them out of the middle.
- Especially if you’re an author yourself: Remind them that authors are not united on this issue.

Thanks for your support.

The Amazon Books Team

P.S. You can also find this letter at www.readersunited.com"

Tuesday, 22 July 2014

Apple Settles to the tune of $400m

So despite still admitting no wrongdoing in the whole eBook price-fixing affair, Apple looks set to pay up nearly a quarter of a billion pounds for its part in the alleged conspiracy.

The BBC has the full article here.


Saturday, 21 June 2014

Apple Won't Go to Court over eBook Price-Fixing Case

Well, it looks as if Apple have settled out of court in their ebook price-fixing lawsuit, in a move which looks calculated to have prevented dirty linen to being aired in public.

The BBC carried the full article earlier this week, here.

Sunday, 15 June 2014

The Fenris Wolf Pack: Revisited and Now Released!

A few of you may remember this post from almost exactly 3 years ago when Chaz started work on his 'something completely different' title for FWB.

Well, finally the White Prince of the Hunting Ground is now out there on Kindle. Aimed at younger readers and taking advantage of the new Amazon age and reading categories, it's one of those projects that kept getting sidelined for other things. There is definitely potential for a sequel with Ciquk and his pack, but we wouldn't like to say anything more at this stage. We'll see how this one performs in the sales rankings first of all, and take it from there.

UK Kindle readers can get it here.
US Kindle readers can get it here.

Wednesday, 28 May 2014

Amazon v Hachette: Round 2

Looks like Amazon and publishers Hachette will be continuing to go toe-to-toe for some time over their respective eBook policies, if this recent article on the BBC is anything to go by.


Underground British Metal for Discerning Listeners

Underground British Metal for Discerning Listeners
Because Chaz is a fan of these guys and their music. Help support the British metal music scene!

Guest Post Submission Guidelines

We're very happy to accept guest posts. The only requirements we have for guest posts on Fenriswulf Books' blog pages are:

1) on-topic posts only: i.e., articles relevant, and of interest, specifically to writers (especially self-published or indie authors) - ideally regarding the creative processes of producing fiction, editing, character, plotting, e-publishing, observations and opinions on the publishing industry generally, experiences of Kindle/Smashwords/Apple, traditional publishing, self-promo and marketing advice for authors (but see *2* below), inspiration & 'writers' block', cartoons/comic books, illustration & design, or creativity in general;

2) absolutely no promotion or reviews of third-party products or services: the only exceptions being other self-pubbed or indie writers that you may be enthusiastic about, or charitable websites or totally free resources online or elsewhere devoted to helping other writers, e.g via interviews, book giveaways, etc. This includes hyperlinks and images. Author book review sites are acceptable as long as they offer free reviews (whether alongside paid-for reviews or not).

3) if in doubt, just ask.

Other than that, feel free to drop us a brief summary of possible posts and we'll let you know by return.

'Sword and the Ring' Book 1

'Sword and the Ring' Book 1
Now Available...in print, or in Kindle format

'Sword and the Ring' Part 1 Book Trailer

'Malaria 9' Book Trailer

"Maranatha" video trailer - for the new 2nd edition

No Ads Here!

Fenriswulf-Books.co.uk is an advert-free site. All promotional links on this page are personally added by Fenriswulf Books to individuals, groups and resources that support us, whom we wish to support, or that we believe will be of interest to browsers of this site.

"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin.

ixquick Metasearch: Protect Your Privacy

Ixquick Privacy

Last Word

All content is (c) Fenriswulf Books 2008-2014. Pages maintained by Chaz Wood, Fenris' adopted keeper (in the absence of Loki).